Weekly Roundup

Ah, Christmas. A time for relaxation, carols, food, and retail…

What I’m reading: The Little Prince, by Antoine de Saint-Exupery. I found the name while reading Horizons, had the book, and had never read it. So I just started reading it.

What I’m listening to: Corner of the Sky from Pippin, New Broadway Cast Recording. The lyrics, “The rivers belong where they can ramble. the eagles belong where they can fly. I’ve got to be where my spirit can run from. Gotta find my corner of the sky.”, have been playing over and over in my head.

What I’m spending time with: Tidying up after Christmas. Seems like a lot was going on this week, run visiting family to prepping for after-holiday festivities. I found a couple neat hacks, including these tips cleaning.

What I’ve shared:

And that’s really it this week.

Adventuring

I think some of the things that make this world so amazing are the people who go out and live life like no other. Take for instance Leon McCarron. Contributing writer to Adventure Magazine, author of such books as The Land Beyond and The Road Headed West, he set out after University on a bike ride halfway around the world. Then decided to keep traveling.

According to McCarron:

“There was a time when explorers traveled to mark the blank spots on the map—but now, in the digital age with fast, inexpensive transportation to once-hidden corners of our world, there’s far less call for flag-planting.

Instead, I see the modern frontier of adventure as storytelling; using immersive, adventurous travel to uncover new ideas. Adventure also applies on a smaller scale, one that’s accessible for all. It can be a daily practice in which we choose to do something different, something that creates a new experience—and that can happen as easily in London as it can in Ladakh. Adventure is everywhere, if we know where to look.”

The challenge is to create those new experiences. Look for the miraculous in your everyday life.

Posting isn’t everything

On posting every day (here in the blog) I could say that I’m hopefully providing meaningful content to the few readers who pop up. Hopefully. The truth is, when we post, we don’t know how the audience receives it.

It seems we were programmed for storytelling to a small audience with instantaneous results (facial movements, gestures, audible responses, etc). I’m thinking of early man of course, and storytelling around a fire.

It wasn’t until the advent of recorded language that the audience could be separate the storyteller. The radio made it vocal, and the television made it visual. The internet, though… the internet made it instantaneous and worldwide. Or, very nearly.

It used to be the teller could gauge an audience. On stage we still do that – whether performing or giving a lecture. You know the temperature of your listeners, and can maybe make some shifts in your delivery, if you want to.

But with the internet, you get it out there and almost immediately it has a life of its own. All you can do is hope that you’ve said it well, and it’s been received well.

Stories

The way in which we consume and process story has changed over the past 15,000 years, but not so very much. Big Fish Presentations gives a brief rundown of storytelling, but what I was thinking about was how YouTube – that incessant time waster – is just another receptacle for story. Sure, the sheer number of stories on YouTube is overwhelming. But, it has itself become a sort of ceremony.

Like early neanderthal, sitting around the fire and grunting out tales of hunts or avoiding death, and paintings on the cave walls showing these endeavors, we now turn to a new media cave wall, where the images are painted more clearly, though the grunting sometimes remains the same.

In an odd form of synchronicity, this story on Michelle Phan hit my inbox this week. Early digital influencer left the public life, but released a new video last week. Her third in two years.